NEPAL LEADERSHIP TREK

RETREAT, RENEW, RETURN

MAY 14 - MAY 27, 2017

                         FOR CORNELL UNIVERSITY ALUMNI AND GUESTS

SUMMARY | ITINERARY  | LEADERS | PHOTOS | FITNESS | TRIP PLANNING | PACKING LIST | OUTDOOR CLOTHING TIPS | REGISTRATION

Outdoor Clothing Tips

THE BIG PICTURE

The attached packing list includes everything you will need to remain comfortable on this trip…outside the lodges… and is designed to cover the extremes at both ends (hot hiking days, cool nights, rain). For example, while you might be hiking in shorts and a t-shirt for most of your time on the trail, you could also find yourself wearing every layer you have on the top of Poon Hill.

We would like to educate everyone on how to dress for the outdoors, so that we all can thoroughly enjoy living and traveling in the mountains.  The technology exists so that we do not need to be wet, cold, or hungry. Our goal is to provide you with the knowledge to enjoy living in the outdoors for the rest of your life.

A FEW GUIDING PRINCIPLES

Light, loose-fitting clothing that ‘breathes’ well will help to keep you cool in the heat. (Your body is trying to cool you off when you sweat, You want to maximize the evaporation next to the skin.)

Dress like an onion so you can peel. The principle of layering is that you are regularly adding and removing layers to keep your body temperature even.  You need to be proactive about adding layers and shedding layers when conditions change… every time you stop along the trail or start up again on a cool day for example.  In colder temperatures you do not want to sweat, or you will get chilled later. Take a layer off.

LAYERING FOR COOL WEATHER

1) Base layer next to skin: The main job of this layer is to wick sweat away from your skin, and then dry quickly so you don't get chilled.  A note about fit: For cool weather, your base layer should be snug, because if it's not touching your skin, it can't wick moisture. That means your sweat sits on your skin until it evaporates, which is going to chill your body, due to evaporative cooling.

2) Insulation: This is the layer that traps your body heat (dead air space trapped between fibers.) In all but the coldest of weather, most of your insulation will remain in your pack while hiking, so your body heat can escape and dissipate. But as soon as you stop moving, put it on so you won't get cold.

3) Shell: The job of a shell is twofold: it cuts the wind and keeps you dry. The idea behind a waterproof/breathable shell (like Gore-Tex) is that it keeps water out, but allows sweat vapor to escape also, so you don't get wet from perspiration inside your layering system. In practice, some people find that a totally breathable nylon shell allows the moisture to escape far more freely than the "waterproof/breathables", so they bring one lightweight breathable nylon shell for fair weather and a waterproof shell for foul weather. Others find that the waterproof/breathables work for them.